.ESL Curriculum.
Levels 3-4-5 Detailed

Adapted by Nada Salem Abisamra

Reading (Levels 3-4-5) Writing (Levels 3-4-5)
High School Curriculum (All levels) Detailed High School Curriculum (Levels 1 & 2)
ESL Level 3- Intermediate

This course is designed to improve studentsí accuracy in using English in classroom situations, and to help them understand the changing world around them. Students will study and interpret a range of texts and produce a variety of forms of writing. Activities will also help students to develop their oral presentation skills and acquire study skills (including note-taking and summarizing skills) that will enhance their ability to learn in all subjects.

Oral and Visual Communication

Overall Expectations

By the end of this course, students will:

  • initiate and take part in conversations, participate in classroom discussions, and make short oral presentations, with teacher guidance, using a variety of subject-specific words and expressions;
  • communicate orally, using a variety of the conventions of English grammar with some accuracy;
  • use appropriately a variety of features of formal and informal communication in English;
  • create and analyze a variety of media works.
  • Specific Expectations

    Developing Fluency in Oral Communication

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • initiate and take part in conversations on a range of topics in a variety of social situations;
  • use tone of voice and gestures to clarify meaning in conversations (e.g., stress key content words to specify meaning);
  • initiate and participate in informal conversations with English-speaking peers;
  • participate in group work, cooperative games, and teamwork;
  • use a variety of strategies to participate in small-group discussions (e.g., ask questions to clarify a point; elaborate and/or modify statements to find a basis for agreement);
  • use appropriate openings and closings in oral presentations (e.g., introduce a topic by asking a question; summarize key points);
  • use an outline provided by the teacher to take point-form notes on main ideas from classroom oral presentations.
  • Developing Accuracy in Oral Communication

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • use common grammatical patterns with some accuracy (e.g., make subject and verb agree; make verb tenses consistent; make possessive pronouns agree with antecedents);
  • use some transition words and phrases to link ideas (e.g., to show sequence, to compare and contrast).
  • Using English in Socially and Culturally Appropriate Ways

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • determine appropriate language use in a variety of social contexts (e.g., at a school assembly, on the sports field...);
  • rehearse language in a variety of social contexts (e.g., role- play different styles of greetings and apologies to peers or teachers; role-play a telephone conversation making an appointment with a friend, a school counsellor, or a prospective employer);
  • recognize and begin to use the style of language appropriate to formal meetings.
  • Developing Media Knowledge and Skills

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • respond through discussion to a variety of media works;
  • identify some features of language used in advertisements to market various products to specific audiences (e.g., repetitions and synonyms, non-standard spellings such as lite);
  • compare information about current events and issues from more than one media source (e.g., television and newspaper accounts of the same event);
  • create a video commercial or print advertisement using features of language appropriate for the intended audience (e.g., create an advertising campaign for the student council).
  • Reading

    Overall Expectations

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • choose and read books at the appropriate reading level for a variety of purposes;
  • demonstrate knowledge of subject-specific terms;
  • read for specific purposes, with teacher guidance;
  • locate and evaluate resource materials for guided research and career exploration, with teacher guidance.
  • Specific Expectations

    Reading and Responding

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • read and respond to a variety of fiction and non-fiction materials selected for study and pleasure (e.g., participate in literature study groups; give short book talks; write book reports);
  • identify a writerís or characterís point of view in short novels;
  • describe the function of various story elements in short works of fiction (e.g., character, plot, setting);
  • identify elements of style appropriate to various text forms (e.g., salutations and closings in letters, summaries in short reports, dialogue in narratives).
  • Developing Vocabulary

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • demonstrate knowledge of some key specialized terms in different subject areas (e.g., photosynthesis, osmosis, membrane in biology);
  • use dictionaries and a thesaurus to build vocabulary.
  • Using Reading Strategies for Comprehension

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • extract information from specific features/sections of grade-level texts (e.g., footnotes, chapter summaries, tables, illustrated figures);
  • recognize patterns of word structure and derivation and use them to determine meaning (e.g., origin/original/originate);
  • demonstrate comprehension of passages containing complex verb forms, with teacher guidance (e.g., sections of grade-level texts containing the past-perfect tense, passive verbs, or conditional structures).
  • Developing Research Skills

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • select appropriate materials for research on classroom topics and for career planning (e.g., select the career pamphlets or databases that are most relevant for a particular research purpose);
  • compare information from various sources for classroom research (e.g., print and non-print magazines and newspapers, CD-ROMs);
  • take notes from a variety of sources, using graphic organizers such as charts and tables as a guide.
  • Writing

    Overall Expectations

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • write in a variety of forms for various purposes and audiences;
  • use the writing process, with teacher guidance, with an emphasis on peer and independent review of content and organization;
  • arrange ideas in logical order and present them in linked sentences and simple paragraphs;
  • use a variety of sentence patterns and conventions of standard English with some accuracy in written work.
  • Specific Expectations

    Relating Purpose to Form

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • make notes in some detail as preparation for writing on familiar topics;
  • compose stories, poems, and dialogues;
  • write expository paragraphs related to classroom assignments or on topics of personal interest;
  • write personal and business letters, using appropriate conventions for salutations and closings;
  • organize personal information, using a simple résumé format.
  • Applying the Writing Process

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • revise first drafts to clarify ideas and improve organization;
  • link simple paragraphs about a central idea, using common transition words (e.g., first, next, then, both) to indicate relationships such as sequence of events or points of comparison;
  • edit their own writing, with attention to specific language features identified by the teacher (e.g., tense consistency, subject-verb agreement, use of articles);
  • use word-processing software to compose and edit their writing;
  • use graphics software to format and embellish their writing.
  • Developing Accuracy in Written Communication

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • use a variety of simple, compound, and complex sentences in their writing;
  • use appropriately, and with some accuracy, common tenses and verb phrases, adjectives, adverbs, conjunctions, prepositions of direction and time, and interrogative and negative constructions;
  • use passive voice, conditionals, and adverb and adjective phrases in some written work;
  • use a colon before a list of items;
  • use parentheses to insert an explanation or afterthought into a sentence;
  • use correct spelling and punctuation for common abbreviations;
  • use learner dictionaries, thesauri, and spell checkers to develop vocabulary and to check the accuracy of spelling;
  • use some visual features of text for emphasis (e.g., italics, boldface, and underlining).
  • Social and Cultural Competence

    Overall Expectations

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • use knowledge of American culture and history in school and social situations;
  • respond appropriately in most teaching and learning situations.
  • Specific Expectations
     

    Developing Awareness and Skills

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • explain the relationship between some important aspects of geography and history and current American issues;
  • demonstrate awareness of the influence of American history and geography on artistic expression (e.g., images of nature in Native art; portrayals of immigrant experiences in American novels and short stories);
  • demonstrate understanding of and sensitivity to the wide variety of cultures and languages at ACS (e.g., explain the benefits and challenges of living among diverse cultures);
  • initiate and participate in conversations about current events and issues.
  • Adapting to ACS Classroom

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • use English or a shared first language to explain school rules, school and classroom routines and expectations, and emergency procedures to new students, and to introduce them to key locations and personnel in the school;
  • describe and compare different approaches to teaching and learning in different cultures (e.g., the role of teachers at ACS and in their country of origin);
  • describe and compare individual learning styles and strengths (e.g., personal learning-style preferences, learning styles of peers in the classroom);
  • negotiate roles and tasks in cooperative group learning activities;
  • identify and describe appropriate strategies for specific learning tasks (e.g., brainstorming to generate ideas; categorizing to manage information);
  • use first languages appropriately in classroom and social situations (e.g., to clarify a term or concept; to provide assistance to newly arrived students).

  • ESL Level 4- High Intermediate

    This course prepares students to use English with increasing accuracy in most classroom and social situations and to participate in ACS society as informed students. Students will develop the reading, writing, and oral presentation skills required for success in all subjects. Students will study and interpret a variety of grade-level texts, develop oral communication skills through participation in informal debates and seminars, and extend their range of research skills.

    Oral and Visual Communication

    Overall Expectations

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • communicate orally in English in a wide variety of daily activities in the community and in the classroom;
  • use the elements of English grammar with increasing accuracy in speech;
  • use appropriate language and non-verbal communication strategies in a variety of situations;
  • create, analyze, and interpret a variety of media works.
  • Specific Expectations

    Developing Fluency in Oral Communication

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • respond to and use some implicit commands and messages (e.g., indirect requests and orders such as: Would you like to rewrite that?, meaning You should rewrite that; Is that where the dictionaries go?, meaning Please put the dictionaries away);
  • recognize and use a variety of conversational strategies (e.g., opening formulas such as How are you?, attention-getting phrases such as Excuse me, turn-taking signals such as Iíd like to add, and closing formulas such as Iíve got to go now);
  • use a variety of communication strategies to bridge gaps in their English-language knowledge (e.g., ask for clarification; paraphrase; use facial expressions and gestures to convey meaning);
  • use the pronunciation, stress, rhythm, and intonation patterns of spoken English with accuracy most of the time;
  • participate in classroom discussions and oral presentations;
  • provide a summary of a group discussion or an activity;
  • use a variety of transition words and phrases in classroom discussions and oral presentations to express relationships such as comparison, contrast, sequence, and cause and effect;
  • follow complex sequences of instructions;
  • take notes from classroom presentations, using a written outline or graphic organizer as a guide;
  • express and support a point of view in classroom discussions;
  • use formal speech for oral classroom presentations.
  • Developing Accuracy in Oral Communication

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • use important elements of English grammar with increasing accuracy (e.g., verb tenses, negatives, adjectives, adverbs, conjunctions, articles, and prepositions of time, direction, and location);
  • correct some common grammatical errors in their own speech (e.g., inconsistent verb tenses, unclear pronoun reference).
  • Using English in Socially and Culturally Appropriate Ways

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • analyze social contexts to determine the appropriate type of language to use (e.g., the suitability of colloquialisms, emphasis, and eye contact in a videotaped speech or interview);
  • recognize and respond appropriately to verbal and non-verbal cues (e.g., identify inappropriate aspects of language and behavior in comedy);
  • use formal and informal styles of language appropriately (e.g., compare and role-play the use of forms of address in different situations);
  • use some idioms and slang where appropriate (e.g., Off the top of my head; Run that by me again);
  • use polite forms to negotiate and reach consensus in small- group tasks (e.g., Would you like to...?, How about...?, Donít you think...?);
  • recognize and use the appropriate style of language for various workplace situations (e.g., evaluate customer and employee interactions as presented in a video; role-play an employee asking for advice from a supervisor).
  • Developing Media Knowledge and Skills

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • respond to a wide variety of media works through discussion and comparison of their own and othersí reactions to the works (e.g., advertisements, news programs, dramatic presentations);
  • identify strategies used in different media to influence specific audiences (e.g., figurative language, provocative visual images, youth-oriented music);
  • analyze media productions to identify different media perspectives on social and cultural issues (e.g., how newspapers and television companies select and present facts, images, and opinions on issues related to race, gender, and age);
  • explain some of the causes and consequences of local, national, and international current events (e.g., explain the causes and consequences of some forms of pollution);
  • create a documentary or news report on a current issue.
  • Reading

    Overall Expectations

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • read and respond to literature, with teacher guidance;
  • use a range of strategies to build vocabulary;
  • extract information from grade-level texts, with teacher guidance;
  • locate, evaluate, and use information from a variety of sources for academic, social, and career purposes, including guided research projects.
  • Specific Expectations

    Reading and Responding

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • identify some common cross-cultural themes in literature (e.g., coming of age, creation of the universe, quests);
  • identify and explain literary elements and devices in teacher- selected texts (e.g., theme, character development, plot, setting, simile, metaphor);
  • make inferences about a writerís point of view or a characterís actions;
  • choose and respond to personal reading material comparable in scope and difficulty to some materials selected by their English- speaking peers;
  • explain their reasons for choosing specific authors and genres (e.g., in book reviews, in literature study groups).
  • Developing Vocabulary

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • use a variety of strategies to build vocabulary (e.g., check learner dictionaries; keep a personal list of words and phrases; seek opportunities to use new words);
  • infer the meaning of many Latin-based words from context and from prefixes, suffixes, and word roots.
  • Using Reading Strategies for Comprehension

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • recognize the elements and purposes of different forms of texts and participate in discussions about them (e.g., subject-area texts, short stories, magazine articles);
  • skim texts for main ideas and overall organization (e.g., skim a section of a reference book to evaluate its relevance for a specific project; skim brochures for career information);
  • scan texts for specific information (e.g., locate required information in a reference book; locate information about specific aptitudes or qualifications in a career brochure);
  • determine meaning in texts that contain complex grammatical elements (e.g., conditionals, modals, passive verbs);
  • recognize transition words and phrases used to indicate definition of terms, classification, sequence, summary, conclusion, comparison and contrast, cause and effect, and hypothesis (e.g., that is, in conclusion, by contrast, as a result, possibly);
  • identify facts, opinions, and perspectives in text.
  • Developing Research Skills

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • use knowledge of a variety of conventions of formal texts to locate information (e.g., footnotes, end notes, and lists);
  • compare ideas and information from a variety of sources for guided research projects (e.g., sources such as print and non- print magazines and newspapers, CD-ROMs, the Internet);
  • summarize main points for guided research projects, using graphic organizers (e.g., charts, tables, Venndiagrams).
  • Writing

    Overall Expectations

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • write in a variety of forms appropriate to different subject areas, personal needs, and career goals, with teacher guidance;
  • use the writing process to prepare final drafts, with teacher guidance;
  • arrange ideas in logical order and present them in linked paragraphs;
  • use the sentence patterns and conventions of standard English with accuracy most of the time in written work.
  • Specific Expectations

    Relating Purpose to Form

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • write to carry out assignments in different subject areas (e.g., short reports, outlines, summaries, editorials, notes, essays, examination answers);
  • write for career-related purposes (e.g., résumés, covering letters, memos, e-mail messages);
  • select and use appropriate forms for personal and creative writing (e.g., diaries, journals, personal letters and e-mail messages, dialogues, poetry, narratives);
  • use descriptive words and phrases to convey mood, atmosphere, and emotion;
  • use the conventions appropriate to particular forms of writing (e.g., letter salutations and closings, cover pages and headings, bibliographies).
  • Applying the Writing Process

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • write a passage of three or more paragraphs to develop a central idea;
  • use transition words and a variety of sentence patterns to express relationships such as comparison and contrast (e.g., similarly, on the other hand) and cause and effect (e.g., as a result of);
  • edit to improve writing style (e.g., to convey a personal voice, to stress objectivity);
  • use visual elements to enhance the effectiveness of published text (e.g., margins for ease of reading, headings and typeface for emphasis);
  • produce final drafts, using appropriate writing tools (e.g., dictionaries, editing checklists);
  • use word-processing software to compose and edit pieces of writing;
  • use graphics software to format and embellish pieces of writing.
  • Developing Accuracy in Written Communication

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • spell words accurately in final drafts, including subject- specific terms;
  • use periods, commas, apostrophes, quotation marks, colons, and parentheses correctly in final drafts;
  • use the semicolon to separate main clauses in a list of ideas;
  • use ellipses to show that words have been omitted from a quotation;
  • use common tenses and verb phrases, adjectives, adverbs, conjunctions, prepositions of direction and time, and interrogative and negative constructions appropriately and with accuracy most of the time.
  • Social and Cultural Competence

    Overall Expectations

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • demonstrate understanding of the rights and responsibilities of American citizens and of ACS students;
  • demonstrate flexibility as learners in different teaching and learning situations.
  • Specific Expectations

    Developing Awareness and Skills

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • participate in discussions about important social documents (e.g., the American Charter of Rights and Freedoms, the Human Rights Code, race relations policies);
  • identify and explain the role of some components of the American political system (e.g., parties, the electoral process);
  • identify and use the skills needed to seek assistance in the school and community (e.g., use, and help others to use, the services of school counselors);
  • demonstrate knowledge of strategies for conflict resolution by participating in simulations, role plays, and group discussions;
  • research and participate in discussions comparing the needs and values of people of different ages and cultures and both genders;
  • participate in discussions and debates about local, national, and global issues and events.
  • Adapting to ACS Classroom

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • participate effectively in a variety of learning and teaching situations (e.g., independent research; oral presentations; varied assessment situations such as tests, examinations, and student-teacher conferences);
  • use study skills effectively (e.g., select appropriate study strategies; use self- monitoring and self-correcting strategies);
  • participate fully in group activities, (e.g., contribute productively to all group tasks, assist others in the group, and help keep the group on task).

  • ESL Level 5- Advanced

    This course prepares students for secondary school English and other courses at the college and university preparation levels. Students will be encouraged to develop independence in reading literary works and academic texts, in writing essays and narratives, and in applying learning strategies and research skills effectively. Students will also learn to respond critically to print and media works.

    Oral and Visual Communication

    Overall Expectations

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • initiate, sustain, and conclude conversations and discussions on a wide variety of topics of personal, social, and academic interest;
  • communicate orally, using patterns of English grammar and pronunciation with the accuracy necessary for continued success in subject classrooms;
  • analyze a variety of social contexts to determine the appropriate style of language and non-verbal behavior to use in them;
  • create and analyze a variety of media works in forms appropriate for different purposes and audiences.
  • Specific Expectations

    Developing Fluency in Oral Communication

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • make effective presentations on classroom topics, with some teacher guidance;
  • express, support, and elaborate a point of view in sustained discussions about classroom topics (e.g., present and defend a position);
  • communicate orally for a variety of education- and career-related purposes (e.g., understand and participate in discussions and presentations on postsecondary educational choices; role-play job interviews, and analyze and evaluate their performance);
  • negotiate solutions to problems, interpersonal misunderstandings, and disputes.
  • Developing Accuracy in Oral Communication

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • monitor their speech for accuracy and correct common grammatical errors (e.g., review their use of articles and prepositions; check for subject-verb agreement);
  • use conventions of oral language appropriately (e.g., transition words and phrases for coherence; repetition for emphasis; pause, stress, and intonation for effect).
  • Using English in Socially and Culturally Appropriate Ways

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • analyze social contexts and adapt their style of speaking to suit the setting and the audience (e.g., use a formal style in a speech for school commencement; use colloquial language at a student council meeting);
  • discuss and analyze instances of miscommunication (e.g., in classroom interaction; in film and video clips).
  • Developing Media Knowledge and Skills

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • explain the relationship between media forms and their intended audiences (e.g., analyze the messages used in advertising directed to different age groups; examine how broadcasting schedules are tailored to specific audiences);
  • analyze media productions to explain how language can be used to de-emphasize or exaggerate the importance of information (e.g., in television commercials, press releases, election campaign literature);
  • create media works for different purposes and explain how the purpose influenced their design decisions in each case (e.g., create an information booklet or a video for newcomers to the school and explain the purpose of its main features).
  • Reading

    Overall Expectations

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • read and respond to literature;
  • choose and respond to personal reading material comparable in scope and difficulty to materials chosen by their English- speaking peers;
  • extract information from a variety of texts used in subject classrooms;
  • demonstrate understanding of the elements of a range of fiction and non-fiction forms of writing;
  • use independently a variety of strategies to build vocabulary;
  • use a range of research strategies independently to gather information for a variety of purposes.
  • Specific Expectations

    Reading and Responding

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • use knowledge of the personal, historical, and cultural backgrounds of authors and audiences to explain themes, situations, and characters represented in texts;
  • demonstrate understanding of some cultural references in Western and American literature (e.g., biblical allusions; references to Greek mythology, Native mythology);
  • compare the treatment of common literary themes in a range of fiction materials (e.g., themes of a golden age, intergenerational conflict, reconciliation);
  • analyze literature and classify it by type and theme (e.g., romance, tragedy, comedy, satire);
  • use a variety of methods to demonstrate understanding of their personal reading (e.g., give a book talk; write a diary entry for a character in a novel; explain the point of view of the author of a magazine essay);
  • write a critical review of a book or article.
  • Developing Vocabulary

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • use a variety of strategies to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words (e.g., consult a dictionary; infer meaning from context; relate unfamiliar words to cognates or word families);
  • use a thesaurus to expand vocabulary and explain its use to others;
  • use all elements of an entry in an advanced learner dictionary and explain their use to others (e.g., elements such as word- class labels, definitions, examples, usage labels, pronunciation keys);
  • explain why they prefer one dictionary to another;
  • take advantage of opportunities to use new words (e.g., in written responses to literature; in classroom discussions).
  • Using Reading Strategies for Comprehension

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • use a variety of cues to extract meaning from a textbook (e.g., cues such as headings, subheadings, graphics, questions, sidebars, summaries);
  • identify characteristic elements of a range of literary genres, including essays, short stories, novels, poetry, and drama (e.g., elements such as imagery, personification, figures of speech);
  • use reading strategies effectively before, during, and after reading and explain their use to others (e.g., strategies such as previewing text, predicting main ideas or outcomes, listing unanswered questions while reading);
  • analyze how informational texts present facts and ideas (e.g., compare how newspapers and periodicals from around the world present information and use format, layout, titles, and styles of address to appeal to specific audiences);
  • record needed information from texts used in classroom subjects (e.g., take point-form notes; fill in graphic organizers).
  • Developing Research Skills

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • gather information from a variety of sources, including electronic databases, websites, and online libraries;
  • synthesize and evaluate the information gathered from a variety of sources for an independent research project;
  • prepare a bibliography of print and electronic sources consulted during research;
  • acknowledge borrowed information, ideas, and quotations.
  • Writing

    Overall Expectations

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • write in a variety of forms, adopting a voice suitable to the intended audience;
  • use the writing process independently to produce a final written or electronic version of an essay or a piece of creative writing;
  • organize and link ideas logically and effectively in written texts such as narratives and essays;
  • use the sentence patterns and conventions of standard English in their writing with the degree of accuracy necessary for continued success in subject classrooms at the college and/or university preparation level.
  • Specific Expectations

    Relating Purpose to Form

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • write coherently on a range of academic topics, using appropriate forms (e.g., précis, reports, essays);
  • write creatively in a variety of forms (e.g., plays, narratives, poetry);
  • write to analyze, interpret, and evaluate information and ideas (e.g., a short essay introducing, developing, and concluding an argument).
  • Applying the Writing Process

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • use a variety of connecting words and phrases to express logical relationships between and among ideas (e.g., prior to and subsequently to indicate sequence, however and whereas to indicate contrast);
  • use a variety of strategies to proofread, edit, and correct writing, focusing on effective style, relevant and interesting content, accurate spelling, and correct use of conventions (e.g., edit with a checklist; confer with peers and teacher; use electronic dictionaries);
  • publish written work, selecting a format suited to the intended audience and using technology such as graphics and desktop publishing software, as appropriate.
  • Developing Accuracy in Written Communication

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • use a variety of spelling strategies, rules, and patterns to spell words correctly;
  • use pronoun references correctly;
  • use appropriately, and with a high degree of accuracy, complex syntactical structures such as the infinitive and/or the gerund as object (e.g., hope + infinitive: I hope to go; enjoy + gerund: I enjoy going); phrasal verbs (e.g., put on, put off, put up with); and participial phrases (e.g., characters appearing in the first chapter, characters introduced in the first chapter).
  • Social and Cultural Competence

    Overall Expectations

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • demonstrate understanding of a range of local, national, and global issues;
  • learn effectively in a wide variety of teaching and learning situations.
  • Specific Expectations

    Developing Awareness and Skills

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • analyze the media coverage of a current local, national, or global issue and present their own views (e.g., write a report or letter or make a speech summarizing the information, comparing perspectives, expressing an opinion, and urging action);
  • evaluate the effectiveness of their own and peersí reports, letters, or speeches on current issues.
  • Adapting to Our Classroom

    By the end of this course, students will:

  • participate effectively in the full range of learning and teaching situations in the school (e.g., discussions in subject classrooms, school-wide presentations, extracurricular activities).

  • Page created by Nada Salem Abisamra on March 9, 2001
    Last updated on August 22, 2004
    All Rights Reserved
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